Still Standing

Ivette Attaud is winner of the “Still I Stand” Award at the Pain of a Blaque Woman Conference in 2012 for a reason. She has made it a life mission to raise awareness about domestic violence. Although it knocked her off her feet when her own daughter died at the hands of her lover, she is still standing 20 years later with a word that this kind of situation does not have to permeate society.

Attaud also knew this kind of violence first hand. She experienced it in a relationship when she was young. She has known countless others who have fallen victim to domestic violence. In fact, Amnesty International is supporting and agitating for the passage of the International Violence Against Women Act (IVAWA). This act has been is designed to address the pervailing violence taken against women all over the world.

On their website they detail how millions of females are subject to all kinds of harmful practices and human rights violations. They report that, statistically speaking, one out of every three women will fall victim to physical abuse, sexual abused or other abuse during their lifetime. on the Amnesty site, they detail different issues around the world. One article, titled, “Circle of Hell,” spells out the pattern of domestic violence and other violence against women in Egypt. It’s only the tip of the iceberg. It is certainly not a problem that happens across the sea.

In her circle of influence, Attaud does everything to lend her strength, her voice and her support to ending domestic violence. Speaking on the subject, she stated, “I am here to show you the changed face of domestic violence – the face that cried, the face that saw the death of a loved one; the face that sees the same pain in others; I am here to show you the other side of domestic violence – the side of healing, contentment, enormous inner strength, empowerment and confidence; the side that stands for something, instead of hiding from everything.

I am here so you can hear the voice of a survivor – the voice that motivates, inspires, and encourages; the voice that no longer uses the word “victim”; the voice that speaks for those who are fearful, the voice for those who have lost their lives because there was no one to protect them; and to keep a promise I made at my daughter’s grave over 20 years ago – that her death would not be in vain.”

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